Friday, February 16, 2018

It is typical for people to find scholarships in their home regions. Information on these can be found by asking local institutions and organizations. Typically, these are less competitive as the eligible population is smaller.

Guidance counselors: When starting to explore scholarship opportunities, most high school students check with their guidance counselors. They can be a reliable resource for local scholarships.
Non-profits and charitable trusts: Most non-profit organizations have at some point of their history founded scholarships for prospective students. The Good Schools Guide, a guide to schools in the UK, states "Charitable grant-making trusts can help in cases of genuine need," and goes on to outline several instances where this may be the case, including an "unforeseen family disaster" and a "need for special education".
Community foundations: Many counties and cities and regions have a local foundation dedicated to giving money in the form of grants and scholarships to people and organizations in the area.
Music teachers: Some music teachers offer reduced-cost or free lessons to help low-income children gain access to an arts education. In addition, some local non-profits provide free music classes to youths.
Foundations: Certain foundations in the United States offer scholarships for entrepreneurial endeavors.
Labor/trade unions: Major unions often offer scholarships for members and their dependent children.[citation needed]
Houses of worship: The local house of worship may or may not have any scholarships for their members, but the religious organization or headquarters may have some available. Theology study is highly encouraged.
Chamber of commerce: Many chambers of commerce offer (usually small) grants to students in the community, especially those planning on careers in business and public service. Even if they do not offer any themselves, one can usually get a listing of members, and many of them may offer small scholarships to local students.
Other volunteer organizations: Many organizations offer scholarships or award grants to students whose background or chosen field overlaps the field of the organization. For example, local chapters of professional societies may help the studies of exceptionally distinguished students of the region. Similarly, charity organizations may offer help, especially if the late parent of the student was a member of the organization (e.g., a Masonic lodge might help the orphan of a lodge brother.) This kind of scholarship is mostly ad hoc.
School: Old, well-known schools are often endowed with scholarship funds.
University: Old, well-established universities may have funds to finance the studies of extremely talented students of little means. Eligibility often requires that a student belong to some special category or be among a nation's best. However, universities provide information on scholarships and grants, possibly even internship opportunities.
PSAT/NMSQT: In the United States, students are offered the opportunity to take the PSAT/NMSQT test, usually in their junior year of high school. National Merit Scholarship programs are initially determined by the scores received on the PSAT/NMSQT test. Some private scholarship programs require applicants to take the PSAT. The test can be used as preparation for the SAT.
Enrichment Centres: In certain countries, enrichment centers have begun to provide scholarships.[13]
Disabilities: Students with disabilities may be able to apply for awards intended for people with disabilities. Those scholarships may be intended for disabled students in general, or in relation to a specific disability.[14]
It has become more prevalent today that scholarships are misconceived[by whom?] to have a discriminatory quality to them. For example, as demonstrated by student-specific scholarships, minorities are thought to have a priority over Caucasian students when it comes to receiving these[which?] scholarships.[citation needed]

These beliefs are known to come from college students themselves who have been affected by their failures at obtaining adequate financial aid.[citation needed] Mark Kantrowitz, author of "Secrets to Winning a Scholarship", explains that the average family tends to overestimate its student's eligibility for merit-based awards and underestimate its eligibility for need-based awards. In turn, the most persistent target of this disapproval tends to be high-profile, minority-based scholarships.[citation needed]

Most scholarships are based on merit or talent, without considering economic need or ethnicity. Since the economically privileged usually have better schools and more access to other educational resources, merit-based awards favor the economically privileged. While Caucasians account for 62% of full-time college students in America,[15] they receive 76% of all scholarships.[16]

Thursday, February 8, 2018


Financial Aid

Three types of financial aid are available for students: scholarships, loans and part-time employment. According to the needs of the family and student, these can be offered individually or in combination. Visit the University of Tennessee's Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships for details and application information.

Since 2004, the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program (or HOPE Scholarship) has been great resource for eligible students and can be combined with other scholarships and financial aid. For more information on the HOPE Scholarship and other forms of financial assistance, visit the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation web site.

Tickle College of Engineering Scholarships

Thanks to the generosity of private and corporate donors, the Tickle College of Engineering and its departments annually award more than $1 million in scholarships to qualified undergraduate students. To apply for engineering scholarships, students must be accepted into the University of Tennessee and the Tickle College of Engineering.

Incoming freshmen, current/returning UT students and new transfer students must apply by submitting the appropriate scholarship application provided on the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships website at Students do need not to apply for specific scholarships as the Scholarship Committee will match qualified students with available awards.

Scholarships are awarded each academic year in the spring for the upcoming year. For more information, contact the Tickle College of Engineering Academic and Student Affairs Office at (865) 974-2454 or visit 101 Perkins Hall.

Scholarships from UT Colleges and Departments

Many of UT’s colleges and academic departments offer scholarships. Some are awarded to entering freshmen, but most are awarded to enrolled students who have met academic requirements in their majors.

To be considered for freshman competitive scholarships, applicants must submit their admissions application by the November 1 priority deadline. Admitted students will be emailed a link to complete the freshman scholarship application. The deadline to apply is December 15.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Bush Foundation Community Innovation grants 2018
Community Innovation grants support communities to use problem-solving processes that lead to more effective, equitable and sustainable solutions. Think of it as civic R&D, allowing communities to develop and test new solutions to community challenges.
There’s a lot of work that happens in between identifying a community problem and implementing a new breakthrough solution, especially if you want to engage your community, make the most of existing assets and work collaboratively with other organizations along the way. The Community Innovation grants support that process – they fund the work that it takes to create a community innovation.
The Foundation provides Community Innovation grants of USD 10,000 to USD 200,000. Community Innovation grants of 500 to USD 10,000 are available from our intermediary partner organizations: Headwaters Foundation for Justice (MN), The Consensus Council (ND) and the South Dakota Community Foundation (SD).
Selection Criteria
Community Innovation Grant Program Fit
  • Does the project use inclusive, collaborative and resourceful processes to pursue an innovative solution to a community challenge?
      • Inclusive: meaningfully engaging key stakeholders – thoughtfully identifying those needed to create the intended change and, whenever possible, including those directly affected by the problem.
      • Collaborative: a true joint effort, with partners willing to share ownership and decision-making as they pursue an innovation together.
      • Resourceful: using existing resources and assets creatively to make the most of what a community already has.
  • Is the process likely to lead to a community innovation – a breakthrough in addressing a community need that is more effective, equitable or sustainable than existing approaches?
  • Is the project plan thoughtful, realistic and does it address the identified community need?
  • Does the applicant have the capacity to execute the work effectively or have a plan to meet the needed capacity?
  • Is the project likely to make a significant, sustainable difference, now or in the future?
  • Will the project inspire or inform others?
Additional Considerations
We seek a final portfolio of Community Innovation grantees with balance across:
  • Size of community
  • Size of applicant organization
  • Size of grant request
  • Demographics of communities served
  • Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and the 23 Native nations that share the same geography
  • Type of issue addressed
  • Community Innovation grants may be awarded to 501(c)(3) public charities or government entities (including schools). Coalitions or collaboratives are eligible to apply, but only one organization may receive the grant.
  • For organizations that do not have 501(c)(3) status, the Foundation accepts Community Innovation grant applications from fiscal sponsors. The fiscal sponsor organization must submit the grant application and, if the grant is approved, becomes the grantee and receives the funds. Our fiscal sponsorship overview provides additional information.
  • Grants must be used for projects located in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota or the 23 Native nations that share the same geography.
  • Grants must be used for a charitable purpose.
Deadline: Ongoing

Paid Internship 2018 at FedEx, USA

Paid Internship 2018 at FedEx, USA
FedEx Corp. provides customers and businesses worldwide with a broad portfolio of transportation, e-commerce, and business services.
Its networks operate independently to deliver the best service to customers without compromise. They compete collectively as a broad portfolio of customer solutions and are managed collaboratively, under the respected FedEx brand.
FedEx offering an internship which is a 10-week assignment for students pursuing a college degree. Assignments are directly related to intern’s academic degree. Under direct Supervision, performs duties as assigned. Student participates in a number of Organized events providing visibility into the overall operations of FedEx.